How The Democrats Will Put Trump In The White House Again

Low turnout, election chaos, conspiracy theories, uninspiring candidates, and internal division — we’re heading for four more years of Trump.

https://flickr.com/photos/peteforamerica/48285335946/

The Democratic caucuses in Iowa are the talk of the world — or, more precisely, the laughing stock. There’s a fairly conventional issue which many are talking about — low turnout, which indicates a difficulty of the candidates to inspire and enthuse.

However, the key issue is the utter chaos at these specific caucuses — for three reasons.

First, it just isn’t great optics for the Democratic party. This one’s simple enough, and I’m losing track of the number of right-wing commentators who I’ve seen making the point, without real merit but with real consequence, that “if the Democrats can’t do this then they can’t govern the country”.

This sort of stuff can be disproportionately and unfairly damaging. Just because it’s unfair, though, doesn’t mean the Democrats aren’t looking silly. The DNC has been incredibly foolish, but we can’t dwell on that now, because to do so will be to fuel the fire.

Then, there are the conspiracy theories — and no-one loves a conspiracy theory quite as much as the hard right, although, unsurprisingly, the hard left has become complicit.

Naturally, despite the rule reform which some have blamed at least partially for the chaos, there are still the conspiracy theories about DNC corruption — that this is little more than a party establishment fix to make sure that Biden or Pete wins the nomination ahead of Bernie.

There might be some truth in this, although, given the rule change which Bernie demanded in 2016, I doubt it. Ultimately, everything is up in the air and no-one really has any evidence. Saying “Pete paid for the app” or “the DNC wants Pete” is all well and good, but you need some good evidence before you do so. Simply joining the dots, which almost always leads to inexactitude, isn’t helpful.

Finally, these conspiracy theories have only served to fuel and highlight the internal division in the party, inflaming the tensions and opening new wounds. As I write, many Democratic voters have been responsible for getting #MayorCheat to number one trending, sure to be pounced upon by Trump and the far-right in an election campaign.

Even if Pete doesn’t receive the nomination, the fifth top trending at the time of writing #DNCisCorrupt, won’t be particularly helpful either.

Top trending in the US on Tuesday morning EST

Let’s take stock about where we are. President Trump will be acquitted of the charges — and he really shouldn’t be. We cannot let him back into office.

At the same time, though, the President is as popular as ever. We can’t afford to be attacking each other and crying “corruption” at the first sight of problems. We have to have a civil, reasoned conversation and be vigilant against division.

Low turnout is bad — but it can be brushed off. Low turnout, though, when compiled with conspiracy theories and violent internal chasms, cannot be brushed off as easily. This will be fatal for the Democratic party in the election, almost certainly. It’s a long, uphill battle to beat an increasingly-popular President Trump from here.

Politics nerd, policy wonk | Founder, medium.com/politics-fast-and-slow | Editor, politika.org.uk | twitter.com/dave_olsen16 | Policy Paper: https://rb.gy/7coyj

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